An Anglican View on Real Presence vs. Substantial Transformation in the Eucharist

William Witt discusses in a very interesting blog post the essential matter of the meaning of the Eucharist from an Anglican perspective.

Here are his suggestions on what a trinitarian view of the Eucharist should entail:

Thus, a trinitarian eucharistic theology seems to have the following implications.

1) The risen Christ transcends the sacramental order. (This may at least be part of the concern that lies behind the Reformed insistence that the body of the risen Christ is “in heaven,” as well as the insistence on all sides that Christ is present in a variety of ways, not merely in the Eucharist.) In addition, the doctrines of the ascension and the parousia indicate that in a very real sense we must speak of the absence of Christ from our midst during this period “between the times.” Whatever we mean by “real presence,” this must not be understood to mean that Christ is present among us in the same way that he was present in Galilee during the first thirty or so years of the first century. Continue reading “An Anglican View on Real Presence vs. Substantial Transformation in the Eucharist”