Some Considerations on A Possible Solution in the Israel/Palestine Conflict

 

map of occupied west bank
Map of West Bank

I believe it is important to start recognising the right of Israel to exist as a state, however ambiguous was its beginning. It is obvious we cannot go back to the situation before 1948.

Also, I really doubt a two state solution is viable anymore. A short glimpse at the Schweitzer-like map of West Bank above, with the separating wall of shame, with all the Israeli settlements and roads, built on stolen Palestinian land, should convince you of that. Peace and occupation, with its apartheid-like separation is totally incompatible with peace. Violence, on both sides, as condemnable as it is, is unavoidable if the present status quo continues.

The right to return for the over 700,000 Palestinian pushed out of their homes in the Nakhba is very problematic, and controversial, because of its demographic implications, which would make impossible the present anachronistic and unsustainable definition of Israel as an ethnic state. But its a priori refusal by the Israeli government makes impossible for the Palestinians to accept the right of Israel to exist.
Continue reading “Some Considerations on A Possible Solution in the Israel/Palestine Conflict”

Water in the West Bank

water in the West Bank

Palestinians and international activists connect a 700-meter water pipe to Palestinian families’ houses in Fasa’il Al Wusta, Jordan Valley, August 17, 2013. According to Jordan Valley Solidarity, communities in the Jordan Valley survive on 20 liters of water per person a day.

The World Health Organization recommends 100 liters.

In the adjacent illegal Israeli settlements in Jordan Valley, average water consumption is 451 liters per person a day. (Activestills.org)

(Source, HERE.)

English Catholic Archbishop Confronts Israel’s Politics in the West Bank

Archbishop risks row with Israel after lobbying Hague over Christians ‘displaced by security barrier’

The head of the Roman Catholic Church in England and Wales has risked a row with the Israeli government after it emerged he lobbied William Hague over the plight of Christians in the West Bank.

The Most Rev Vincent Nichols urged the Foreign Secretary to address the “tragic situation” facing of Palestinians displaced by the building of the Israeli security barrier in Beit Jala, a predominantly Christian town a little over a mile from the Church of the Nativity.

He said the “expropriation” of land by Israel had a “catastrophic impact” on the village and risked furthering the conflict. Much of the land has been owned by religious orders and Catholic families dating back 200 years. Continue reading “English Catholic Archbishop Confronts Israel’s Politics in the West Bank”

What Do South Africa and Israel Have in Common?

Repeatedly during the Church of Scotland’s General Assembly, reference was made to South Africa – to the significant role churches and Christians played in supporting the apartheid regime there and the equally significant role churches and Christians played in finally ending it.

On Wednesday 25 May, the Assembly discussed today’s apartheid regime – a regime that privileges Jewish ethnicity as the Afrikaners privileged whiteness, a regime that treats the native Arabs of Palestine as second-class citizens if they live in Israel proper, as third-class non-citizens if they live in the territories illegally occupied by Israel for over 40 years, and as fourth-class non-persons if they are the millions of Palestinians, or the children or grandchildren of Palestinians, who have been exiled from their land, while Israel steadfastly refuses their right, enshrined in international law and recognised in UN resolutions, to return home. Continue reading “What Do South Africa and Israel Have in Common?”