Rumi – Love. The Joy that Wounds

You are the drop, and the ocean.
You are kindness, you are anger,
You are sweetness, you are poison.
Do not make me more disheartened.

You are the chamber of the Sun,
You are the abode of Venus,
You are the garden of all hope.
Oh, Beloved, let me enter.

* * *
In it incredible how this poem by Rumi, the 13th century Sufi poet, reads like the Song of Songs.

Nasrudin on Sacredness

“The trickster Nasrudin is found sitting in a church
with his feet upon the altar.
The local priest comes in and shouts:
‘Nasrudin, never put your feet on something sacred!’
Perplexed, Nasrudin looks around: ‘Oh, forgive me!
But where can I put them that isn’t sacred?'”

(A Sufi story from An Emerald Earth by Felicia Norton and Charles Smith. Source, HERE.)

Rumi – Who Says Words with My Mouth

If my previous post of Rumi caught your imagination, here is another poem of his.

Who Says Words with My Mouth was written in the 13th century by the Sufi mystic poet Jalal ad-Din Rumi and translated and recited in our film by Coleman Barks.

17 December 2013 – 740th Anniversary of Rumi’s Death

Here is a video presentation of one of Rumi’s amazing mystical poems.

‘December 17 is the 740th anniversary of the death of the Sufi poet Rumi, whose Persian writings are considered to be a pinnacle of mystical art that transcends religious, cultural and ethnic boundaries. Also known as Mevlana, he died on December 17, 1273 in Konya, Turkey, where he is entombed below the Mevlana Museum.

Rumi’s death anniversary is known in Turkey as Wedding Night, or Seb-i Arus in Turkish, which references the idea that when a Sufi saint dies, he or she is believed to have attained union with beloved God. Therefore, it is an occasion of celebration rather than mourning and Sufis gather together to recite poetry and prayers, and whirl in tribute.’

Read more about it on Huffington Post website.