A Prayer for Rachel Held Evans

Rachel Held Evans

Almighty God,

we grieve the loss of Rachel and we pray for her family,
and so we remember before you today your faithful servant Rachel;

and we pray that, having opened to her the gates of eternal life,
you will receive her more and more into your joyful service,

that, with all who have faithfully served you in the past,
she may share in the eternal victory of Jesus Christ our Lord;

who lives and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God,
for ever and ever.

Amen.

BCP (edited by Scot McKnight)

Scot McKnight – Why Anglican? – 1

More than twice a month I am asked “Why did you become Anglican?” The answer to the question is complex, and I want to answer that question in part by saying up front that I don’t believe in ecclesiastical superiority. I don’t think any single church or denomination is the one true church. I’ve heard more than a whiff of this from folks as varied as Plymouth Brethren, Eastern Orthodox, Roman Catholic (in spades, frankly), Baptist, Evangelical Covenant, and United Methodists. So in this series I’m not saying that the Anglican Communion is the one-true-and-always-faithful church in the world.

I became Anglican because of the church calendar. (Not only because of the church calendar but it was part of the process.) Non-calendar Christians usually observe Christmas (not always Advent, though it is growing) and Good Friday and Easter. That’s about it. The rest of the year is up to the preacher, the pastor, the elders and deacons, and up to the congregation. Many pastors wisely organize their churches to be formed over time through a series of themes — or books of the Bible (Martyn Lloyd-Jones and John Piper preached through Romans for almost two decades) — but none can improve on the centrality of Christ in the church calendar. Continue reading “Scot McKnight – Why Anglican? – 1”

Scot McKnight – Bury The Word “Evangelical”


Scot McKnight, at the centre of the picture

[This ia stern warning from a leading evangelical. We better listen. And, I openly admit, I fully agree with Scot.]

It’s time to bury the word “evangelical.” It’s both past time to bury it but it’s also time yet again to bury it.

I have a strategy for doing so, but first this:

Kate Shellnutt, at CT, writes,

More than 80 years ago, the first president of Princeton Evangelical Fellowship aspired for the organization to allow students “to enjoy Christian fellowship one with another, to bear united witness to the faith of its members in the whole Bible as the inspired Word of God, and to encourage other students to take, with them, a definite stand for Christ on the campus.”

In 2017, the Ivy League student ministry remains fully committed to this purpose … just without calling themselves evangelical.

The long-running organization changed its name this year to become Princeton Christian Fellowship, citing baggage surrounding the evangelical label.

“There’s a growing recognition that the term evangelical is increasingly either confusing, or unknown, or misunderstood to students,” the organization’s director, Bill Boyce, told The Daily Princetonian.

It’s not an issue limited to the 8,000-student campus; a number of evangelicals across the country share his concerns, particularly after last year’s election linked evangelical identity with support for President Donald Trump in the public eye.

Which leads me beyond the obvious: one of the more openly affirming institutions of evangelicalism, CT, records the news that evangelical is an embattled term while CT presses forward with no desire to diminish the centrality of the term for itself. But this essay is not about CT.

It’s about that dreaded term “evangelical.”

It’s a case of only a few who like the term while many despise the term, all the while knowing there’s no other term to use.

The issue is politics; the presenting painful reality is Trump. The reality is 81% of evangelicals voted for Trump. The word “evangelical” now means Trump-voter. The word “evangelical” is spoiled.

Which means the problem is not nearly so large among self-confessed evangelicals. They admit to being evangelicals and voting for Trump and evidently see no dissonance. We don’t know how many of that 81% held their nose when they voted for Trump but this is certain: they weren’t voting for Hillary Clinton. Their evangelical convictions and their political convictions were inter-looped into voting for Trump and not Hillary (or a Democrat). Continue reading “Scot McKnight – Bury The Word “Evangelical””

Scot McKnight – The Gospel of the Gospel Coalition

The Gospel Coalition is an association of pastors and theologians around fidelity to the gospel and a commitment to make that gospel known and to support pastors and churches in gospel-shaped ministries. So, when the two major architects of TGC edit a book (The Gospel as Center) that expounds its principal statements on principal ideas, the one on gospel is to be seen as a center piece of the whole.

In general, TGC is known for its “confessional” (though not in the sense of the Reformed confessions specifically, or the Lutheran confessions specifically) and “evangelical” approach and therefore its gospel is nothing other than a robust commitment to a reformed soteriology. The “confession” is then the alliance of these Christian leaders around TGC’s “confession,” and this book contains chapter length discussions of TGC’s principal statements. (After the jump I have clipped their “Gospel” statement.)

If the movement is about the gospel, then “What is the gospel?” statement by Bryan Chapell expresses the heart of TGC. This chp weaves into it a marvelous story of the gospeling of his brother, David, and how that gospel restored the marriage of his parents.

First, Chapell defines gospel somewhat as follows (and I have added the numbers): “the message that God has (1) fulfilled his promise (2) to send a Savior (3) to rescue broken people, (4) restore creation’s glory, and (5) rule over all with compassion and justice. So he argues “Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners” (1 Tim 1:15) is a good summary of the gospel. Continue reading “Scot McKnight – The Gospel of the Gospel Coalition”

How Patriarchy Silences Women (Rachel Elizabeth Asproth)

Source: How Patriarchy Silences Women (Rachel Elizabeth Asproth)

Scot McKnight shares today this post on patriarchy by Rachel Elizabeth Asproth. Here is a summary:
1. Patriarchal History Questions the Importance of Women’s Existence
2. Patriarchal History Minimizes Women’s Contributions
3. Patriarchal History Pigeon-Holes Women
4. Patriarchal History Is Hyper-Focused on Female Sexuality

Scot McKnight – Why Be Anglican: The Collects

churchcalendar

Dr. McKnight continues his efforts of explaining why has he joined Anglicanism. As many friends are asking me the same question, I have decided to share here Professor McKnight’s responses. I will not be able to do it better than him, anyway. So, here is a new epidoee in this series. Today, about the Collects.

* * *

The collects of the church reveal the church’s practices and beliefs about prayer; a collect is a set prayer for a set time in the church calendar.

In them we see the church’s theology of prayer come to expression. I posted about the collects here and included a reference to a fine book “collecting” the collects: C. Frederick Barbee and Paul F.M. Zahl,The Collects of Thomas Cranmer.

There are five basic elements of a collect, and each of these expresses the Christian theology of prayer:

1. Address to God
2. Naming a context in which God has been active and therefore why God can be addressed now.
3. The petition.
4. Hoped for outcome.
5. Shaping the prayer in a Trinitarian context. Continue reading “Scot McKnight – Why Be Anglican: The Collects”

Scot McKnight -Why Be Anglican: Lectionary

I am doing a series on the blog about why I became Anglican, and thefirst week I looked at the church calendar and last week at worship, and this week I want to dip into “worship,” by which I mean Sunday morning worship service. (I do not equate worship with Sunday morning worship, but Sunday morning worship is worship.) This week I look at the Lectionary.

I’m not a historian of the lectionary, and it is common property to a wide range of churches and that is why today it is called “The Revised Common Lectionary” and it is available online here.

In essence, the RCL is a 3-year cycle of Bible readings for Sunday worship (and daily readings as well). The lectionary is built on the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, with John weaved in over the three years. The Bible readings in a lectionary-based worship service are ordered into an Old Testament lesson, a reading from the Psalms, a reading from an Epistle, and then “The Gospel.”  As the church calendar is rooted in the life of Jesus (see the image above), so the lectionary readings from the Bible aim at the Gospel reading and prepare for it and enhance it. This squares the church on the Gospels as the gospel.

Read HERE the rest of this text

Scot McKnight – Why Be Anglican: Worship

anglican

I am doing a series on the blog about why I became Anglican, and last week I looked at the church calendar, and this week I want to dip into “worship,” by which I mean Sunday morning worship service. (I do not equate worship with Sunday morning worship, but Sunday morning worship is worship.)

If the church calendar shapes the church themes, the church liturgy for Holy Eucharist is shaped by a customary set of elements of the worship service. Each of these is needed, each is integrated into the other, and each is formative for Christian discipleship. To repeat from last week’s blog post, I don’t idealize or idolize Anglican worship, but I believe it is a mature, wise, and deeply theological tradition at work.

I have taken for my text this morning last week’s worship guide, or bulletin. Here are the elements of our worship and eucharist celebration: processional hymn, a call to worship, the Word of God, the proclamation of the Word of God, the Nicene Creed, prayers of the people, confession of sin, passing the peace, and then we move into Eucharist beginning with an offering, doxology, the great thanksgiving, breaking of bread, a prayer of thanksgiving and we close with a blessing. Continue reading “Scot McKnight – Why Be Anglican: Worship”

No Creed but the Bible?

Scot McKnight on Jesus and orthodox faith in the 21st century

Source: No Creed but the Bible?

I fully agree with Scot McKnight, when he says: ‘…there is no such thing as a creed-less Christian. Everyone puts things together, and that putting together becomes “creedal” the moment it filters what we read in the Bible into a pattern of thinking about the Bible. Sorry folks there is only one option: affirm the creeds of the church or affirm your own creed. But either way you’ve got a creed.’

So, no Creed, no faith; and a useless Bible.

No Evolution Allowed (RJS)

 

Scot McKnight on Jesus and orthodox faith in the 21st century

Source: No Evolution Allowed (RJS)

Here is the story of Tremper Longman’s ‘conversion’ to theistic evolution.

He stands in a long list of rmarcable people, of (more or less) Evangelical persuasion, who went on a similar pilgrimage of faith. Here is the list of those who share theiir testimonies in this book, along with the above mentioned biblical scholar: N.T. Wright, Scot McKnight, Francis Collins, Jennifer Wiseman, Denis Lamoureaux, James Stump, James K. A. Smith, Richard Mouw, John Ortberg, Daniel Harrell, Ken Fong.

And, for full disclosure, I have to say that I have personally followed the same track, mostly for reasons related to biblical hermeneutics.

What Is Real Anglicanism?

anglican

This post is inspired by a series of recent posts by Scot McKnight on the nature of Anglicanism.

If we are to believe Michael P Jensen, the rector of St Mark’s Anglican Church in Sydney, Australia, and a member of the (very) reformed Gospel Coalition, but I hope we do not have to, Anglicanism is just a peculiar variation of Calvinism. No surprise there, for one of the promoters of the Sydney kind of fundamentalist/(ultra)conservative Anglicanism.

Here are the 9 points in Jensen’s article, as sumarised by  Scot McKnight:

1. Since the arrival of Christianity in Britain in the 3rd century, British Christianity has had a distinct flavor and independence of spirit, and was frequently in tension with Roman Catholicism.

2. The break with Rome in the 16th century had political causes, but also saw the emergence of an evangelical theology.

3. Anglicanism is Reformed.

4. Scripture is the supreme authority in Anglicanism.

5. Justification by faith alone is at the heart of Anglican soteriology.

6. In Anglican thought, the sacraments are “effectual signs” received by faith.

7. The Anglican liturgy—best encapsulated in the 1662 Book of Common Prayer—is designed to soak the congregation in the Scriptures, and to remind them of the priority of grace in the Christian life.

8. Anglicanism is a missionary faith, and has sponsored global missions since the 18th century.

9. Global Anglicanism is more African and Asian than it is English and American.

Continue reading “What Is Real Anglicanism?”

Scot McKnight – Three Terms for “Church” Today

Allow me to use three Greek terms to describe how church is not only understand but practiced today. If you observe the practice you can describe the understanding behind it. Each is an expectation that can be met by participating in that expectation. I offer today some thoughts about three models of church at work in our minds and our practices, and send you to A Fellowship of Differents for an exposition of the third sense.

Leitourgia

That is, church is worship service. The Germans calls this Gottesdienst, and many Americans when they say “church” mean “going to a church building on Sunday morning for a worship and sermon service.”

Some leitourgia models focus on worship order (the liturgical, lectionary model, eucharist-focused) while others focus on the sermon.

No matter what is believed, for many “church” means the leitourgia. It means what happens when Christians gather on Sunday morning to sing, read Scripture, hear a sermon, and for some participate in eucharist. Continue reading “Scot McKnight – Three Terms for “Church” Today”

Again on Al Mohler’s Comments – History, Evangelicals, and Protestantism | Carl R. Trueman | First Things

History, Evangelicals, and Protestantism | Carl R. Trueman | First Things.

Here is another comment on Mohler’s pathetic discussion about the two Baptists who ‘left the fold’ to be one a Catholic priest and the other an Anglican bishop.

This time the comment comes from Carl Trueman, from Westminster Theological Seminary, a Reformed school.

Trueman argues that Mohler’s position on the Bible, which is implicit in his comments is unfaithful to Reformation teaching. he writes:

‘A Protestantism which fails to acknowledge those historical roots and indeed to teach them to its young people leaves itself vulnerable to Canterbury and Rome. There is an historical dimension to Christianity which is important and which needs to be an integral part of pedagogy and discipleship. McKnight is correct to point to the weakness of strands of evangelical Protestantism in this area and we do well to take his criticism to heart.’

Bob Allen – Al Mohler: Baptists, Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Catholics (or Anglicans)

Brad & Chad Jones
Brad & Chad Jones in their family garden (WSJ)

A Southern Baptist seminary president says churches are to blame when young people leave the fold to follow another faith tradition.

A recent Wall Street Journal story profiling twin brothers who followed separate spiritual paths — one to become an Anglican bishop, the other a Catholic priest — represents failure by the Southern Baptist church in which they were raised, according to Southern Baptist Theological Seminary President Albert Mohler.

Mohler, who posts a daily podcast commenting on current events on his personal website, said March 6 he has no firsthand knowledge of First Baptist Church in Elkin, N.C., home church of the men now in their 40s featured in a March 3 article headlined “When We Leave One Religion for Another: How two brothers, raised Baptist, found their way to two different faiths.” But the story of young seeking answers outside their evangelical upbringing is all too common.

“We are losing far too many evangelical young people as they reach older ages because they are simply not adequately grounded theologically in the Christian faith,” Mohler said. “They may go to vacation Bible school, and they may go to Sunday school, but the question is, are they really grounded in the Christian faith? Are they well-grounded in the beauty of Scripture? Are they well-grounded in a knowledge of the deep theological convictions that define us as Christians?”

Continue reading “Bob Allen – Al Mohler: Baptists, Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Catholics (or Anglicans)”

John Frye – My Conversion to Egalitarianism

egalitarian

Note: This text was published on Scot McKnight’s blog on Patheos. I personally did not have the special experience Frye describes here. My ‘conversion’ away from the hierarchical view of gender roles came progressively, mostly because of a hermeneutical shift in my thinking. The greatest obstacle for me was the lack of historical precedents of ordained leadership in the Bible – then I found lady Junia, the Apostle, and the lack of historical precedents in church history – then I realised how history is manipulated by power and misogyny, especially after Augustine. So, I changed. Because of my Marxist past I do not feel comfortable with calling my new position ‘egalitarian’, although I can accept it, if by it we mean equal dignity, and I also believe that ‘complementarity’ is a pretty good way of describing gender roles, if tehse are not rigidly defined and if hierarchy and patriarchy is excluded. It’s complicated, I know. But it is supposed to be so. 🙂

Read below Frye’s testimony.

* * *

This is the story of my conversion from the hierarchical view of the role of women in home and church to the egalitarian view.

My seminary training landed me exegetically and theologically in the hierarchical camp. I use hierarchical, not complementarian because the nub of the issue is a functional hierarchy. While competing views of the crux interpretum (1 Timothy 2:12 in context) were acknowledged in seminary, a lot of attention was paid to the pronouns in 1 Timothy 3:1-7 with the multiple use of “he.” It was pointed out, of course, that Paul writes “husband of one wife/ one woman man,” so elders [expanded to mean ordained leaders] clearly had to be men. Continue reading “John Frye – My Conversion to Egalitarianism”

Scot McKnight – The Eight Themes of Liberation Theology

Scot McKnight   roger-olson
Scot McKnight                        Roger E Olson

In a recent post on Patheos, Scot McKnight summarises a recent text of Roger Olson (I think he refers to The Journey of Modern Theology: From Reconstruction to Deconstruction) in which, in the context of his synthesis of modern theology, he deals also with liberation theology. place.

Liberation theology, which also includes feminist theology, as a subdivision, does not have a very good image in Eastern Europe and much of conservative theology, be it Catholic, Orthodox or Protestant/Evangelical. The reason is the  extensive use of Marxist social critique by liberationists, even if they do not usually share the atheistic presuppositions of Marxism or its violent methodology (the revolution) to bring about social change. Of course, there are different versions of liberation theology, from its milder evangelical versions, to the most extreme liberal ones. Of course, those who are critical of liberation theology are usually picking on the extremes, as a means of discrediting this way of doing theology.

I have to confess that I have shared, for many years, these prejudices against liberation theology, until I can personally in contact  with some of its representatives in my World Vision work, and I have realised that, in fact, these people have a lot to offer for theological renewal, especially in the (quite stale, these days) evangelical theological scene.

Here are, according to McKnight, the eight themes of liberation theology, as summarised by Olson: Continue reading “Scot McKnight – The Eight Themes of Liberation Theology”

Ask Scot McKnight…(Response)

Ask Scot McKnight…(Response).

Scot McKnight is one of the fee biblical scholars I follow regularly. I am glad to see that Rachel likes him too.

Here is a series of answers Scot gave to questions asked by readers on Rachel’s blog.

Bonhoeffer on Theological Challenges in Protestant Congregations

Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Scot McKnight quotes Bonhoeffer on a delicate matter in Protestant/Evangelical contexts. Here it is.

For Protestant congregations there are certain prejudices that make it more difficult for the congregation to have a proper relationship to theology.

The pietistic: Theology is a matter of the head; what matters is the heart.
 Thus theology divides, while the piety of the heart unites.

The orthodox: All preaching is instruction, theology, true theology = true faith, the sum total of true propositions.

The academic: Theology is rigorous scholarship, study, university, not for the laity.

The evangelization [volksmissionarisch] circles: People are not mature enough for theological distinctions—first mission, then theology.

The ecclesiastical political: Theology disrupts the political unity of the church. The sectarian.
 A particular theology is the whole truth of the gospel.

Scot McKnight – The Politics of Bible Translations

bible1

This is a very important article for those interested in matters of Bible translation. Here is the beginning of it.

* * *

The Bible you carry is a political act. By “Bible” I mean the Translation of the Bible you carry is a political act. Because the Bible you carry is a political act the rhetoric about other translations is more politics than it is reality. The reality is that the major Bible translations in use today are all good, and beyond good, translations. There is no longer a “best” translation but instead a basket full of exceptional translations.

The world in which we live, however, has turned the Bible you carry into politics. So here goes for my politics of translation at the general, stereotypical level, and it goes without having to say it that there are exceptions for each, [added: and I have “de-raced” my descriptions to avoid that conversation]:

The NIV 2011 is the Bible of conservative evangelicals.
The NLT is the Bible of conservative evangelicals.
The TNIV is the Bible of egalitarian evangelicals. Continue reading “Scot McKnight – The Politics of Bible Translations”

Sarah Pulliam Bailey – Evangelicals and Catholics Together marks 20 years

Archbishop Welby and Pope Francis
Pope Francis and Justin Welby

When evangelicals and Catholics set aside centuries of mutual suspicion 20 years ago, the idea was fairly simple: Even if we can’t always work together, at least let’s not work against each other.

Now, two decades after the launch of the group Evangelicals and Catholics Together, relations between the two groups appear stronger than ever, forged by shared battles over abortion, same-sex marriage, religious freedom and immigration.

A new pope is finding crossover appeal among evangelicals who share Pope Francis’ emphasis on evangelism and his distaste for the fancier trappings and authoritarianism of the papacy. Continue reading “Sarah Pulliam Bailey – Evangelicals and Catholics Together marks 20 years”

The Day Evangelicalism Shook over Hell

The Day Evangelicalism Shook over Hell.

Scot McKnight about John Stott’s annihilationism, the thing that ‘shook evangelicalism’. Stott was the the first evangelical leader to pint out to the the strange interest, if not love, that evangelicals have for hell.

One may require a little bit of psychoanalysis in order to understand that.

Scot McKnight on Heretics vs Hypocrites

Recently, Scot McKnight commented on Owen Strachan, the new ‘hawk’ in the Southern Baptist army, accusing Rachel Held Evans of ‘heresy’, because of her egalitarian stance.  In doing this, Strachan used a typical fundamentalist tactic: extending the borders of the Gospel, in order to include in them their favourite non-essentials.

This time, Scot discusses the fact that, in the gospels,  Jesus was much more interested in matters of religious hypocrisy than in matters of doctrinal accuracy, a topic on which my Southern Baptist friends should do well to meditate seriously. And look in the mirror, from time to time.

Here is what Scot write on this topic: Continue reading “Scot McKnight on Heretics vs Hypocrites”

Scot McKnight – Who is a Heretic?

Who is a Heretic?.

This is Scot’s response to the question in the title, again about Strachan’s accusation of heresy addressed to Rachel Held Evans.

Al Mohler in Conversation with Stanley Hauerwas

Al Mohler  Stanley Hauerwas
–       Al Mohler                     Stanley Hauerwas

Scot McKnight published today on his blog a fragment from a very interesting recent dialogue between Al Mohler, President to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, and Stanley Hauerwas, Gilbert T. Rowe Professor Emeritus of Theological Ethics at Duke University, a post-liberal theologian from the Methodist tradition.

Here is this fragment:

* * *

Mohler:            The very next essay in this book you write about the end of Protestantism and that leads me to ask a very personal question: as an American evangelical Christian, do you think that Evangelicalism is in many ways the quintessential representation of the American faith and do you think that even as you write about the church in general – I actually don’t want to put a message in your mouth, I’d rather here it from you, but I get the impression that when you look at American Christianity in general, and American Evangelicalism in particular, you appear to see a church that is looking less and less like the church. Continue reading “Al Mohler in Conversation with Stanley Hauerwas”

Scot McKnight Ordained As An Anglican Deacon

Scot McKnight deacon
Bishop, Todd Hunter, Scot McKnight, Pastor Jay Greener (source, HERE)

On 26 April 2014 Scot McKnight, Professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary in Lombard, IL., and one of my favourite authors, was ordained as deacon in the Anglican Communion.

Here is a short story of his jourvey into Anglicanism, as told by himself.

* * *

I grew up among America’s Baptists (CBofA), attended Cornerstone University (GARB sponsored at the time), went to TEDS (EvFree) and then did my doctorate at Nottingham, began my teaching career at TEDS and then moved to North Park (EvCovenant) and am now teaching at Northern, which is an American Baptist Church sponsored seminary. For almost a decade Kris and I attended Willow Creek but it became increasingly too far for us to travel and, when one Wednesday night it took me nearly two hours to get to Willow, it became clear we’d have to think of a church closer to home. Continue reading “Scot McKnight Ordained As An Anglican Deacon”

Walter Wink: One of a Kind

Walter Wink: One of a Kind.

Scot McKnight about a new bibliography of Walter Wink, an absolutely fascinating theologian whose trilogy on ‘the powers that be’ has influenced many people in my generation.

I had the privilege of meeting Walter and his highly creative wife during an Open Book conference organised by the British Bible Society. I will never forget his unique personality.

David Atkinson – Why Do Christians Disagree?

Every Saturday, Scot McKnight share with us on his blog his virtual meanderings. One of the items he has shared with us in today’s Weakly Meanderings is David Atkinson’s text Why Do Christians Disagree? A very good question, indeed.

Here are, in summary, his answers:

1.  Because they look to different sources of authority
2.  Because they draw on different guiding metaphors for God Continue reading “David Atkinson – Why Do Christians Disagree?”

Scot McKnight – Liberation Themes among Evangelicals

Scot McKnight continues his analysis of Molly Worthen’s book Apostes of Reason. The Crisis of Authority in American Evangelicalism, which, he contends, ‘will become a potential watershed in that she has revealed why the coalition mindset that many of us want and believe in struggles to find genuine centrality among evangelicals because the gatekeepers would prefer less diversity at the table while also wanting the numbers for support in the movement’.

Here is the beginning of his new blog post, which I hope will convince you it is worth reading the whole of it on the Patheos platform. Continue reading “Scot McKnight – Liberation Themes among Evangelicals”

Molly Worthen on Defining American Evangelicalism

In a recent blog post, Scot McKnight recommends a new book on American Evangelicalism published by Oxford University Press, Apostles of Reason. The Crisis of Authority in American Evangelicalism, by Molly Worthen.

Molly Worthen is Assistant Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the author of The Man on Whom Nothing Was Lost: The Grand Strategy of Charles Hill and is a regular contributor to The New York Times, Slate, Christianity Today, and other publications.

Here is the presentation of the book on Amazon:

Evangelical Christianity is a paradox. Evangelicals are radically individualist, but devoted to community and family. They believe in the transformative power of a personal relationship with God, but are wary of religious enthusiasm. They are deeply skeptical of secular reason, but eager to find scientific proof that the Bible is true.

Continue reading “Molly Worthen on Defining American Evangelicalism”

What did the Creed do to the early Christian beliefs about Jesus?

What did the Creed do to the early Christian beliefs about Jesus?.

Scot McKnight continues his series on NT Wright’s new book on Paul with some comments on Wright’sposition on the creedal dimension of faith, as rooted in Hebrew, not just Greek thinking.

Since the creedal and historical rootedness dimension of the faith is one of the reasons that prompted me to join Anglicanism this interests me to the highest degree.

I wonder what my friend Dr. Eugen Matei thinks about this, as he explores the place of creeds in the history of the Baptist faith(s).