Richard Rohr on ‘Incarnational Mysticism’

Years ago, someone asked if I could sum up all my teachings in two words. My response was “incarnational mysticism.” The first word, “incarnational,” is Christianity’s specialty and should always be our essential theme. We believe God became incarnate. The early Fathers of the Church professed that God, by taking on human flesh, said yes to all that was physical, material, and earthly. Unfortunately, Christianity lost this full understanding.

Many Christians are scared of the word “mysticism.” But a mystic is simply one who has moved from mere belief or belonging systems to actual inner experience of God. Mysticism is more represented in John’s Gospel than in the three Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, and Luke) which give us the basic story line of Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection. In fact, the primary reason many are not moved or attracted to John’s Gospel is because they were never taught the mystical mind. Continue reading “Richard Rohr on ‘Incarnational Mysticism’”

Mysticism and Human Dignity @ www.anamchara.com

Mysticism and Human Dignity @ www.anamchara.com.

‘It’s interesting to me that the most vocal critics of mysticism often seem to be those who have the most pessimistic view of human nature, stressing such ideas as the “total depravity” of humankind. It’s almost as if the mysticism-haters are saying “we reject mysticism because, frankly, we have no faith that God could ever love something as disgusting as a human being.”’