Johnnie Moore – My Take: Jesus was a dirty, dirty God

Here is a very daring case for the necessary understanding of the humanity of Christ. I paste below the first part of an article published on the CNN belief blog (I thank David Neff, from Christianity Today, for this link.). I am sure some people will be scandalised; and they should be. Sometimes that’s the only way you can make people think.

Johnnie Moore, the author of this text is he author of the book Dirty God. Jesus in the Trenches,  that has just been published by Thomas Nelson. He is a professor of religion and vice president at Liberty University. Continue reading “Johnnie Moore – My Take: Jesus was a dirty, dirty God”

David Neff – An Interview with Mark Noll on the Foundation of the Evangelical Mind

In 1994, Wheaton College historian Mark Noll published The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind—”an epistle from a wounded lover” that decried the anti-intellectualism of evangelical religious culture. Noll’s newest book, Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind (Eerdmans, released in August), devotes far less space to criticism and offers instead a foundational vision: The basic truths of Christian faith are the key to Christian scholarship. Christianity Today editor in chief David Neff recently spoke with Noll (now teaching at the University of Notre Dame) about the book.

Although it’s not the main subject of Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind, most people will want to know: Are you more optimistic today about the state of the evangelical mind than you were 17 years ago?

I am more optimistic, though not overwhelmingly so. The problems endemic to modern Western culture undercut Christian thinking the same way they undercut every other kind of serious intellectual life. The tendencies among evangelicals that undercut serious reflection are also still pretty strong—for example, the populism and the immediatism, the idea that if there is a problem, we have to solve it right away. Continue reading “David Neff – An Interview with Mark Noll on the Foundation of the Evangelical Mind”

“Come and See”:  A Christological Invitation for Science, Part 3 | The BioLogos Forum

“Come and See”:  A Christological Invitation for Science, Part 3 | The BioLogos Forum.

[Part I of this series may be read HERE.]

In Part II of this series, (taken from Mark Noll’s new book Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind), Noll discussed a debate between two different schools of 13th century thought concerning the relationship of God’s being to that of all other beings. The outcome of this debate, he writes, exerted considerable influence on later Western history. One view, that of Thomas Aquinas, “held that this relationship is largely analogical, that is that while humans and the created world were certainly like God in many ways, the essence of God remained a mystery known only to himself.” So for example, “everything in the world, he [Aquinas] insisted, happened because of God’s direction. But some things happen contingently, or with the appearance of randomness. The logic of their contingency is perfectly clear to God, but because God in his essence is hidden to humans, humans may not be able to grasp how that which they perceive as random could be part of God’s direction of the universe.” The opposing view was held by Duns Scotus. “His position argued for the univocity of being. The only way to know the essence of anything is through its existence. Although God is much greater and much wiser than humans, his being and the being of all other things share a common essence.” It was Scotus’s views that prevailed. Noll believes that the fact that the western church sided with Scotus rather than Aquinas has had significant ramifications for how we think of divine activity in the natural world, and this in turn has played no small role in the current disconnect between mainstream science and evangelical Christianity. In today’s essay, Noll goes on to explore B.B. Warfield as a 100 year old case study of how one person retained a “commitment to the goal of harmonizing a sophisticated conservative theology and the most securely verified conclusions of modern science.” Although, we have posted a significant number of profound articles and video clips on our web-site, we are not sure we know of a single more poignant representation of what BioLogos seeks to do than what is demonstrated in this reflection upon the work of B.B. Warfield.

 

“Come and See”:  A Christological Invitation for Science, Part 2 | The BioLogos Forum

“Come and See”:  A Christological Invitation for Science, Part 2 | The BioLogos Forum.

This is the second in the BioLogos series of excerpts from Mark Noll’s book Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind.

In this, part II of the series, Noll “explores historical reasons for the difficulties besetting efforts at bringing scientific knowledge and biblical wisdom together.” Continue reading ““Come and See”:  A Christological Invitation for Science, Part 2 | The BioLogos Forum”

Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind by Mark Noll | Thinking Matters

Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind by Mark Noll | Thinking Matters.

You may listen (and download) at this link three lectures (and Q&A sessions) that Mark Noll did in 2009 on the topic of his new book Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind.

Thanks to RomGabe for this link.

Mark Noll On a Christological Invitation for Science, Part 1 | The BioLogos Forum

Mark Noll On a Christological Invitation for Science, Part 1 | The BioLogos Forum.

This is the first from a BioLogos series of excerpts from Mark Noll’s new book Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind. Absolutely remarcable.

Here are a few quotes: Continue reading “Mark Noll On a Christological Invitation for Science, Part 1 | The BioLogos Forum”

NT Wright – What Did Jesus Know?

You may also read HERE a commentary on this important topic of the implications of the full humanity and divinity of Jesus, as defined at the Council of Chalcedon.