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Yohanna Katanacho – Yom Kippur. A Palestinian Christian Perspective

yom-kippur

Today, we celebrate in Israel the day of atonement or Yom Kippur. It is a day of repentance, humiliation before God, and forgiveness. On this day, there is no eating, no bathing or washing, no anointing, and no marital relations. It is a day dedicated to seeking the forgiveness of God. It is a day in which God expects from those who follow Him to forgive the sins of others.

Can Jews forgive the sins of the nations who attacked and abused them? Can they reflect on their own sins that led our country to the current situation? Can Palestinians forgive the Jewish people? I pray that I will discover my own sins on this day and will seek to forgive and bless all of my neighbors. I also pray that my Jewish neighbors will seek true forgiveness that is much more than just ritual celebrations. Perhaps, the test of Yom Kippur is more than ritual! It is also an ethical one. Furthermore, it seems to me that Jewish ethics today cannot be divorced from the Palestinian question. The latter is the litmus test for the authenticity of celebrating Yom Kippur in Israel in the 21st century. Such forgiveness would change the hearts of the nation as well as its politics leading to the support of a politics of peace and reconciliation rather than war and further alienation. May God answer the desires of all the hearts that seek forgiveness and bless them with true atonement! As a Christian I found this atonement embodied in the Messiah, Jesus of Nazareth who died on the cross for my own sins. Read More »

Căl(c)ătorul în ale credinței: un itinerar – Coram Deo

Nu doar în navigație se face periplu. Nu doar marinarii acostează – după o alchimie doar de ei știută – de la un port la altul. Și căutătorii în ale credinței fac la fel. Sufletul omului însetează mereu și se […]

Source: Căl(c)ătorul în ale credinței: un itinerar – Coram Deo

I noua cronica, de culoare evident evanghelica, la ultima cartea a lui Ioan T Morar.

Bihoreanul – Lansare sarbatoarea corturilor la Oradea

Source: eBihoreanul Mobile | Stiri pe mobil

Iata un nou articol despre lansarea de la Oradea a cartii lui Ioan T Morar, Sarbatoarea corturilor.

Ioan T. Morar și-a lansat „conserva de Arad” la Librăria Corina – Special Arad

Ziar online cuprinzând știri din Arad, din țară și străinătate, investigații de presă și reportaje locale, cultură, opinie, pamflete, administrație și sport.

Source: Ioan T. Morar și-a lansat „conserva de Arad” la Librăria Corina – Special Arad

Un nou articol despre lansarea de la Arad a cartii lui Ioan T Morar, Sarbatoarea corturilor

Lansare Ioan T Morar, Sarbatoarea corturilor la Bucuresti

Lansare Sarbatoarea corturilor, Bucuresti

Marți, 31 mai, la ora 18.00, la Librăria Cărturești Verona (Str. Arthur Verona 13-15, București), Ioan T. Morar va dialoga cu Cristian Pătrășconiu despre noul său roman, Sărbătoarea Corturilor, apărut de curînd în colecţia „Fiction Ltd.” a Editurii Polirom, şi în ediţie digitală).Read More »

Exista si o versiune electronica a cartii lui Vasile Ernu, Sectantii

Sectantii - Vasile Ernu

Un anunt special pentru prietenii mei din strainatate.

Sectantii (eBook)

AUTOR: Vasile Ernu
COLECTIE: EGO-GRAFII
PRET:
25.11 RON
DOMENIU: Memorii, jurnale, corespondenta
ISBN EPUB: 978-973-46-5450-5
ISBN PDF: 978-973-46-5451-2
ANUL APARITIEI: 2015
FORMAT: ePub (Adobe DRM), PDF (Adobe DRM)

Puteti comanda AICI aceasta carte in format digital

A aparut versiunea electronica a cartii lui Ioan T Morar, Sarbatoarea corturilor

sarbatoarea-corturilor-ioan-t-morar

Sarbatoarea Corturilor (eBook)

AUTOR: Ioan T. Morar
COLECTIE: FICTION LTD
PRET:
31.95 RON
DOMENIU: Literatura romana
ISBN EPUB: 978-973-46-6100-8
ISBN PDF: 978-973-46-6101-5
ANUL APARITIEI: 2016
FORMAT: ePub (Adobe DRM), PDF (Adobe DRM)

Gasiti AICI linkul unde puteti comanda cartea.

 

Într-o confesiune dramatică – ARADON

La Librăria Corina s-a lansat, azi, romanul „Sărbătoarea Corturilor” de Ioan T. Morar.

Source: Într-o confesiune dramatică – ARADON

Lansari ale cartii Sarbatoarea Corturilor la Timisoara, Arad si Oradea

Afis-Timisoara

Iata ce scrie domnul Morar despre lansari, pe blogul sau:

Astăzi am definitivat datele și orele pentru lansările din afara Bucureștiului (unde voi fi la BookFest). Așadar, la Timișoara, pe 25 mai, ora 18.00, la Librăria Esotera.

A doua zi, 26 mai, la ora 12.00, la Arad, la librăria Corina. Și, în aceeași zi, la ora 16, în Oradea, la Librăria Gutenberg.

Din pacate, nefiind in tara, nu pot participa la niciuna dintre ele, dar sper, totusi, intr-o lansare la Iasi, cindva in toamna, cind revin in tara.

Benjamin L Corey – 5 Reasons We So Blindly Support Israel in Spite of the Truth or Biblical Ethics

mary-joseph-israeli-soldiers

Over the course of time I’ve noticed a troubling trend: it’s *almost* impossible to have a reasonable discussion with fellow Christians who believe we are called to give unwavering support the modern secular nation state of Israel.

This of course, has led me to try to figure out why this is the case. Why do so many Christians reject basic facts about Israel? Why do so many of us have an aversion to believing truth on this issue?

As your list-maker-in-chief, I have a few ideas as to why this seems to occur. So, here are my 5 reasons so many of us irrationally support Israel– in spite of truth or biblical ethics:

1. Bad theology regarding Israel has led us to become victims of our own confirmation bias

2. We don’t listen to Palestinian voices– not even our Christian brothers and sisters in Palestine

Read More »

Iasi, Romania Jewish Heritage 2

Iasi, Romania Jewish Heritage1

 

Romulus Balasz – Souvenirs de Iasi – trailer

A documentary that explores the story of Iasi pogrom through the traces remaining today in Romania.

Click on this link to know more about the film and to help bring this film to life : http://bit.ly/1RYiqhc

Version en Français : https://youtu.be/DLkO-cW-KOs
Versiunea în română: https://youtu.be/6j7WUJcTupo

Rabbi Jonathan Sacks on His New Book ‘Not in God’s Name’

Notable Rabbi Jonathan Sacks talks to Andrew Marr on “The Andrew Marr Show” about the War on Terror; Islam; Islamic Extremism and the history of religion combining with war.

* * *

If you are interested, you may listen below, to a lomger discussion about this very important book.

Are Islam’s Allah and Christianity’s God the Same Deity? | University Abbey

My virtual friend Carson Clark discusses in tis post the tough question of whether Christians and Muslims worship the same God. Here are just two comments on this matter:

  1. Until about a century ago, the unanimous answer of Christians was a resoundiong  ‘yes’. We need to ask ourselves what made us all to of a sudden doubt it.
  2. This question cannot be answered legitimately if we cannot also add to it the question if Christians and Jews worship the same God. If we answer yes to this question and no to the second, we are in a blatant contradiction.

 

Visit the post for more.

Source: Are Islam’s Allah and Christianity’s God the Same Deity? | University Abbey

Message of A Palestinian Christian to ‘Christians United for Israel’

My name is Elizabeth Daoud. I, like over a million Palestinians, am both Palestinian and Christian. I actually come from the Assyrian Orthodox Church, the first and original church of Christians in the Middle East. My parents were born in Palestine and have a long blood line from Jerusalem and Bayte Sahour. Many members of my family were first hand victims of the “nakbah” and had to flee their homeland after being expelled from their homes by Zionist militias, leaving them without the right to return to their land, even to this day. Today in Palestine, Christianity is experiencing what some believe is a crisis. The plight of Palestinian Christians, similar to what Palestinian Muslims are going through, is daily injustice at the hands of oppressive, doctoral and inhumane police forces of the Israeli government. This is occurring in both the West Bank and Gaza, where my Palestinian people live under a brutal and illegal military occupation, and also inside Israel itself, where Palestinians, Muslim and Christian, live as second-class citizens.

Palestinian Christians, like their Muslim brothers and sisters, have lived under Israeli policies of occupation and injustice while many living in the West deny this fact. Many Palestinian Christians feel betrayed by Christians living in North America and Europe who support the state of Israel and the oppression of the Palestinian people. We see them as hypocritical, standing by a state that has left us Palestinians, indiscriminately Christian and Muslim, without a state for over half a century.

Today, Palestinian Christians live under harsh, extreme oppression and apartheid policies. While Christian and Muslim Palestinians living in the West Bank under the heavy hand of martial law are not permitted to vote, undocumented Jewish settlers are subject to civil law and are allowed to vote in Israeli elections. South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who fought to end Apartheid in South Africa, has even embraced the movement of boycott, divestment and sanctions against Israel until they respect my people’s equal rights, an end to the occupation and the return to the homeland which Israel expelled them from, saying, “I have witnessed the systemic humiliation of Palestinian men, women and children by members of the Israeli security forces … Their humiliation is familiar to all black South Africans who were corralled and harassed and insulted and assaulted by the security forces of the apartheid government.” Palestinian land continues to be confiscated and Palestinians continue to be humiliated by the Israelis for their religious beliefs. They were almost unable to celebrate Christmas in 2014 due to riots and street fights caused by the Israeli Police. They experience unemployment, poverty and illegal occupation. Moreover, they are routinely prohibited from visiting one of the most holy sites of Christianity: the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in the Old City of Jerusalem, the church that commemorates Jesus’ crucifixion, burial and resurrection from the dead.

As a Palestinian Christian, it is truly upsetting and disappointing to see Christians United for Israel justify the oppression of Palestinian Christians under the banner of Christian values. Palestinian Christians don’t have the smallest right to visit even the holiest of sites that started Christianity because of Israeli policies. How can Christians United for Israel be in support of this when indigenous Christians are being prevented from exercising Christianity in the very place that Jesus walked. I end this by calling upon CUFI to please stop justifying oppression, persecution and repression of my people in the name of the message of the Bible and my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.

Elizabeth Daoud is a Rutgers Business School senior double majoring in finance and management information systems.

(Source, HERE)

The Peacemaking Palestinian Evangelicals of Israel

AS Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu concluded cantankerous negotiations to finalise his right-wing cabinet, Palestinian-Israeli evangelicals were hoping for something better.

Alienated by campaign rhetoric stigmatising Arab citizens as an electoral threat, they turned in response to the source they know best: the Gospel.

In doing so, they seek to reverse a disturbing trend of isolation from society as a whole, and in particular their Jewish neighbors.

‘Are we not asked to be the salt and light of the earth?’ asked Revd Azar Ajaj, president of Nazareth Evangelical College, in an open letter shortly after the Israeli elections.‘How important, then, to show love to those who have been styled as our “enemies”. In fact we are asked to be peacemakers.’

And from April 16-18, he gathered 60 local and international leaders to discuss how.Read More »

Rabbi Joshua Stanton – Two Faces of Evangelical Christianity

two faces

An evangelical pastor saved my life. But not in the way you are probably thinking.

While a sophomore at Amherst College, I was trying to find my way. Without a clear path, I figured that philanthropy would be a nice occupation. But to be a philanthropist, I needed to make money and lots of it. So I set my sights on finance and began working towards a major in economics.

Even as I was pursuing a lucrative (and generous) future, I remained rooted in Judaism. I had been brought up in the Conservative movement and had long been active in my synagogue and, in college, the international Jewish campus organization Hillel. In time, I became co-president of the organization’s Amherst chapter and began taking part in regular meetings with Amherst’s director of religious life, the Rev. Dr. Paul Sorrentino.

Paul was not like most pastors I had met, or for that matter religious leaders of any sort. Although he spoke to me about his own beliefs and process of becoming reborn as a Christian, it was not with the intention of proselytizing. He did not want to preach all the time. Instead he wanted to listen. He heard of my ambitions and also saw my love of Judaism. So he planted a seed in my mind, telling me, “You know, you would make a wonderful rabbi, if that were something you were interested in.”Read More »

Ben Irwin – Why Evangelicals Should Think Twice about Equating Modern Israel with Israel of the Bible

The other day, I raised a question for evangelicals who think standing with Israel means supporting them no matter what. How do you reconcile a “never criticize Israel” mentality with the overwhelming witness of the biblical prophets?

If you’ve been told that unconditional support for Israel is the only “biblical” position, that the modern-day state enjoys the same kind of “most favored nation” status with God as ancient Israel did, then here’s another question. If Israel today is entitled to the covenant blessings spoken by the Old Testament, what about their covenant obligations?

The Bible never spoke of Israel’s covenant blessings apart from their obligations. It’s no use trying to have one without the other. And at least one of these obligations poses a bit of a problem for the modern state of Israel, if it is indeed the same nation as the one in the Bible.Read More »

Christ at the Checkpoint 4 – The Gospel in the Face of Religious Extremism

Christ at the Checkpoint

Bethlehem Bible College invites you to the fourth “Christ at the Checkpoint” Conference, which will take place in Bethlehem from March 7-10, 2016. The conference hopes to follow the success of the first three conferences (2010, 2012, and 2014). The theme of this conference will be “Christ at the Checkpoint 4: The Gospel in the Face of Religious Extremism”.

The motivation for organizing the “Christ at the Checkpoint” conference is that the Israeli/Palestinian conflict with its many complexities still exists. In fact, since our last conference in March 2014, the conflict and the reality of the occupation have worsened. The religious aspect of the conflict, which has not been the primary issue in the past, has become more pronounced. We have seen a marked increase in religious extremism particularly within the Jewish and Muslim communities in our region, and, to a lesser degree, in the Christian community in the West. More than ever, as the Evangelical Christian community in Palestine, we feel an urgent and relevant need to address these issues.Read More »

Statement of In Defense of Christians (IDF) President Following Disruption at Gala Dinner

Toufic Baaklini - IDC President
Toufic Baaklini – IDC President

In Defense of Christians President Toufic Baaklini issued the following statement in response to a disruption at the Inaugural Summit Gala Dinner: “As Cardinal Rai so eloquently put it to the attendees of the In Defense of Christians’ inaugural Summit gala dinner: ‘At every wedding, there are a few problems.’  In this case, a few politically motivated opportunists chose to divide a room that for more than 48 hours sought unity in opposing the shared threat of genocide, faced not only by our Christian brothers and sisters, but our Jewish brothers and sisters and people of all other faiths and all people of good will.

“Tonight’s injection of politics when the focus should have been on unity and faith, momentarily played into the hands of a few who do not adhere to IDC’s principles.  They were made no longer welcome.

“When we set out to form In Defense of Christians, many in the foreign policy and faith-based communities said such an effort was impossible.  That it would be too difficult to bring such a diverse group of Christian sects, religious and human rights organizations together to draw attention not only to the plight of the deteriorating situation facing our Christians brothers and sisters, but also to the plight of all people of faith, in the Middle East who are suffering.Read More »

Ted Cruz Booed Off Stage at Historic Summit on Middle East Christians

Organisers of an inaugural event held in Washington to highlight the persecution of Christians in the Middle East have said they remain focused and ‘undaunted’ after an incident in which a US senator was booed off stage for his support of Israel.

Attendees at the inaugural In Defense of Christians (IDC) Summit heard warnings that the brutality facing Christians and minorities in the Middle East is only worsening; and were reminded of the need for a united effort to bring an end to the atrocities to prevent further destabilisation in the region.

On Wednesday, Ted Cruz, a Republican junior United States senator from Texas, was speaking during the gala dinner at the summit, which has drawn together global leaders in the US capital over the past three days.Read More »

Hind Makki – 7 Questions to Ask Before Asking if Muslims Condemn Terrorism

Many in the Western world, especially among Christians, are asking why Muslims are not condemning terrorism. As if this would be a self-evident fact.

They at least ask. There is, however, even among Christians, especially those of a more fundamentalist persuasion, a growing number of people who are simply accusing Muslims that, in fact, they are not only NOT condemning violence in the name of Allah, but in fact they are condoning it. And, tho this, they add that violence and terrorism is intrinsic to the Muslim faith and the Qur’an.

Such people are guilty of conveniently forgetting the violence done in the past, or present, by Christians, in the name of their own faith,  from the Crusades, to the present so-called ‘war on terror’, as well as the violence and terrorism used by Jews, in the name of Yahweh, either in the so-called Joshua genocide, or the use of sheer terrorism in Palestine prior to the establishment of the state of Israel, in 1948. Not to speak of Israel’s state terrorism during the present bloody war in Gaza.

This being the case, it is good for us to listen to the voice of moderate Muslims, as we may learn a thing or two from them. During my work for World Vision, I had myself the privilege of meeting a few such moderate voices, among which I have to mentioned Dr. Muhammad Farooq Khan, from Pakistan, who paid with his life for his convictions and his actions on behalf of peace and inter-faith reconciliation.

I copy here below a set of questions that Hind Makki, a Muslim journalist in Chicago, suggests we should ask before wondering if Muslims condemn or not violence in the name of Islam (an example of which you can see in the video clip above). Here are the questions:Read More »

Joint Statement on Israel and Gaza by Imam Mohamed Magid and Rabbi Michael G. Holzman

Joint Statement on Israel/Gaza

July 22, 2014

Imam Mohamed Magid & Rabbi Michael G. Holzman

The current military operations in Israel and the Gaza strip should disturb all people of faith. The only moral path to a solution between Israelis and Palestinians (Israeli Jewish/Muslim/Christian and Palestinian Muslim/Christian) will be dialogue and negotiation. This is a long and arduous path, but the faith that grounds our traditions can sustain the slow evolution of history. The current conflict is an outgrowth of over a century of opposing narratives and ideological differences that no military operations can resolve.

Our traditions exist to uphold the moral foundations for civilizations and as such we urge an end to the current violence. While we acknowledge the need for self defense, when the can of violence opens, as it has now, worms of vengeance and blood-feud crawl out. Then people begin to abandon the principles of justice and mercy upon which civilizations are founded. Instead they turn to more tribal urges, seeking retribution for past wrongs.

We believe the current violence crosses that line. At some point people cease looking for solutions and instead succumb to base human urges for violence. They crave the blood of the enemy to compensate for the pain of loss. This is the way of our animal instincts, the ethos of ancient tribes and clans who exist only to protect all within, while opposing all others. The teachings of our ancestors rose above that thinking long ago to build great civilizations. We believe that when we look to our texts and traditions we can rise above the narrative of suffering and victimization to find roads to healing and wholeness.

The Torah this week teaches of the “Cities of Refuge” (Numbers 35: 6-28) places where a person can flee after an accidental death or manslaughter in order so that relatives of the deceased cannot exact revenge. The one who flees must face criminal justice, and the City of Refuge serves as both a haven and prison for the man slaughterer while restricting the blood thirst of the avenger. The people living in Israel and Gaza can look at the current situation and see only murder and intentional killing, or they can see how decades of hatred breed spontaneous violence. In these heated emotions, our traditions call for cooling off, seeking refuge, and then finding a path to justice. Only through such systems can order and peace be restored.

Several verses from the Quran also give us reminders to work for the protection of life and how to respond with good and forgiveness in times of major challenge and conflict.

“Good and wrong cannot be equal; repel wrong with something which is better and verily he between whom and thyself was enmity may then become as though he had always been a close, true friend.” (Quran 41:34)

The recompense for an injury is an injury equal thereto (in degree): but if a person forgives and makes reconciliation, his reward is due from God: for (God) loveth not those who do wrong(Quran 42:40)

Those who spend (freely), whether in prosperity, or in adversity; who restrain anger, and pardon (all) humans;- for God loves those who do good(Quran 3:134)

“Whoever kills a person, unless [as punishment through due process] for murder or mischief in the land, it is as though he has killed all mankind. And whoever saves a life, it is as though he had saved all mankind.” (Quran 5:32)

While we do not pretend to know the pain of the mourners, we also urge them to honor their loved ones not through the tribal urge for revenge, but rather to build up societies of justice and mercy.

These values are the cornerstones of civilization and the paving stones to peace. Seeking more blood for blood only perverts and discards the great traditions of Islam and Judaism. We abandoned an “eye for an eye” centuries ago. Now we urge our brothers and sisters in the Middle East to seek a solution that protects the self while fostering compassion for the other.

Read More »

David Grossman – On hope and despair in the Middle East

Separation wall (Mary Perry)
Iarael’s wall of shame

Hope and despair. For years, we were tossed back and forth between one and the other. Today, most Israelis and Palestinians seem to be in a gloomy, flat, state of mind, one with no horizon; dully comatose, a self-induced numbness.

Today, in an Israel that has known so much disappointment, hope (if ever mentioned at all) is always hesitant, a bit timid, and apologetic. Despair, on the other hand, is utterly confident and self-assured, as if speaking on behalf of a law of nature, an axiom that states that between these two peoples there shall never be peace, that the war between them is a heavenly decree, and that altogether, it will always be bad here, nothing but bad. As despair sees it, anyone who still hopes, who still believes in the possibility of peace, is at best naïve, or a deluded dreamer, and at worst, a traitor who weakens Israel’s wherewithal by encouraging it to be seduced by false visions.

In this sense, the Israeli right has won. The right, which adheres to this worldview – certainly over the last decades – has managed to instill it in a majority of Israelis. One could say that the right has not only vanquished the left: It has vanquished Israel. And not just because this pessimistic worldview is pushing Israel into paralysis in the area most fateful to its survival, the area where boldness and flexibility and creativity are required; the right has vanquished Israel by crushing what once could have been called “the Israeli spirit”: that spark, the ability to remake ourselves, that “nevertheless” spirit, and courage. And hope.Read More »

Some Considerations on A Possible Solution in the Israel/Palestine Conflict

 

map of occupied west bank
Map of West Bank

I believe it is important to start recognising the right of Israel to exist as a state, however ambiguous was its beginning. It is obvious we cannot go back to the situation before 1948.

Also, I really doubt a two state solution is viable anymore. A short glimpse at the Schweitzer-like map of West Bank above, with the separating wall of shame, with all the Israeli settlements and roads, built on stolen Palestinian land, should convince you of that. Peace and occupation, with its apartheid-like separation is totally incompatible with peace. Violence, on both sides, as condemnable as it is, is unavoidable if the present status quo continues.

The right to return for the over 700,000 Palestinian pushed out of their homes in the Nakhba is very problematic, and controversial, because of its demographic implications, which would make impossible the present anachronistic and unsustainable definition of Israel as an ethnic state. But its a priori refusal by the Israeli government makes impossible for the Palestinians to accept the right of Israel to exist.
Read More »

World Vision Update on Gaza

A World Vision update.

Please pray for peace in Palestine and Israel.

An Honest Israeli Jew Tells the Real Truth about Israel

Miko Peled was born in Jersusalem into a famous and influential Israeli Zionist family. His father was a famous General in the Israeli Army, of which Miko also served his time. When Miko’s niece was killed by Palestinian suicide bombers, you may have expected the family to put Palestinians at fault, but surprisingly they blamed the state of Israel, and their violent torturing and persecution for driving people to such sadness that they would take their own lives.Read More »

Yohanna Katanacho – The Kingdom of God in the Gospel of John

This was an absolutely brilliant presentation.

Dr. Yohanna Katanacho teaches Biblical studies at Bethlehem Bible College.

Colin Chapman – Can Christianity Survive in the Middle East?

Colin Chapman is one of the most important Protestant specialists in Islam.

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