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Comentarii pe baza unui text legat de sintagma ‘spatiul intelectual laic’

Domnul Costel Ghioancă a lansat o discuție pe pagina sa de pe platforma academia.edu legata de implicațiile pe care le are utilizarea sintagmei „spațiul academic laic” în codul etic al Universității București, invitându-mă să comentez cu privire la textul afișat de domnia sa, ceea ce am și făcut (textul său poate fi accesat AICI, dacă aveți un cont pe această platformă).
Dat fiind că, după opinia mea, această discuție este de interes mai larg, am decis să afișez aici comentariile mele. Sper că textul meu este destul de explicit pentru cei care nu au acces la academia.edu. Dacă nu, sunt deschis să ofer explicații.

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Stimate domnule Ghioancă,

Cred ca înțeleg motivația acestui text, și consimt la ea, dar nu împărtășesc, necesarmente, nici unele dintre premise, nici concluziile ei. Iată, deci, câteva observații personale pe marginea articolului dvs.:

  1. Mai întâi, nu doar în acest text, ci în general în limba romana, inclusiv în DEX, avem de-a face cu o confuzie terminologica izvorâta din analfabetismul religios care domină spațiul public după modernitate. Sorgintea ei este una comunista în prima instanța, si aceasta este întărita de uzajul terenului paralel francez, ‘laicité’, în loc de secular/secularitate.

Termenul ‘laic’ este la origine unul eclesial, si este opusul terenului ‘cleric’. Ca atare, el se refera NU la cineva care este anti- sau a-religios, ci la o persoana nu este hirotonită/ordinata, indiferent daca acea persoana este un credincios sau nu. Continue reading “Comentarii pe baza unui text legat de sintagma ‘spatiul intelectual laic’”

Reading Wars – Philip Yancey

Source: Reading Wars – Philip Yancey

Don’t you love the always candid Philip Yancey? I really do.

This is an article everybody should read. Please find below a few excerpts:

‘ I used to read three books a week. One year I devoted an evening each week to read all of Shakespeare’s plays (OK, due to interruptions it actually took me two years). Another year I read the major works of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. But I am reading many fewer books these days, and even fewer of the kinds of books that require hard work.

The internet and social media have trained my brain to read a paragraph or two, and then start looking around.  When I read an online article from The Atlantic or The New Yorker, after a few paragraphs I glance over at the slide bar to judge the article’s length. My mind strays, and I find myself clicking on the sidebars and the underlined links. Soon I’m over at CNN.com reading Donald Trump’s latest Tweets and details of the latest terrorist attack, or perhaps checking tomorrow’s weather.’

‘Neuroscientists have an explanation for this phenomenon. When we learn something quick and new, we get a dopamine rush; functional-MRI brain scans show the brain’s pleasure centers lighting up. In a famous experiment, rats keep pressing a lever to get that dopamine rush, choosing it over food or sex. In humans, emails also satisfy that pleasure center, as do Twitter and Instagram and Snapchat.

Nicholas Carr’s book The Shallows analyzes the phenomenon, and its subtitle says it all: “What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains.” Carr spells out that most Americans, and young people especially, are showing a precipitous decline in the amount of time spent reading. He says, “Once I was a scuba diver in the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski.” A 2016 Nielsen report calculates that the average American devotes more than ten hours per day to consuming media—including radio, TV, and all electronic devices. That constitutes 65 percent of waking hours, leaving little time for the much harder work of focused concentration on reading.’

‘I’ve concluded that a commitment to reading is an ongoing battle, somewhat like the battle against the seduction of internet pornography. We have to build a fortress with walls strong enough to withstand the temptations of that powerful dopamine rush while also providing shelter for an environment that allows deep reading to flourish. Christians especially need that sheltering space, for quiet meditation is one of the most important spiritual disciplines.’

‘Boredom, say the researchers, is when creativity happens. A wandering mind wanders into new, unexpected places. When I retire to the mountains and unplug for a few days, something magical takes place. I’ll go to bed puzzling over a roadblock in my writing, and the next morning wake up with the solution crystal-clear—something that never happens when I spend my spare time cruising social media and the internet.

I find that poetry helps. You can’t zoom through poetry; it forces you to slow down, think, concentrate, relish words and phrases. I now try to begin each day with a selection from George Herbert, Gerard Manley Hopkins, or R. S. Thomas.

For deep reading, I’m searching for an hour a day when mental energy is at a peak, not a scrap of time salvaged from other tasks. I put on headphones and listen to soothing music, shutting out distractions.’

‘We’re engaged in a war, and technology wields the heavy weapons. Rod Dreher published a bestseller called The Benedict Option, in which he urged people of faith to retreat behind monastic walls as the Benedictines did—after all, they preserved literacy and culture during one of the darkest eras of human history. I don’t completely agree with Dreher, though I’m convinced that the preservation of reading will require something akin to the Benedict option.

I’m still working on that fortress of habit, trying to resurrect the rich nourishment that reading has long provided for me.’

The Hidden Roots of Betsy Devos’s Educational Policies | The University of Chicago Divinity School

Source: The Hidden Roots of Betsy Devos’s Educational Policies | The University of Chicago Divinity School

Here it is, in case you want to understand the roots of Betsy Devos’s hyper-Calvinistic theocratic views on education.

Ready! Set! Go! – A Very Moving Video from Roma Education Fund

Find HERE the websote of Roma Education Fund Romania.

Șnurul și pedagogia neagră în România

Source: Șnurul și pedagogia neagră în România

 

Ma intreb cu obstinatie citi dintre evanghelicii din Romania sunt, de fapt, promotorii, pe fata sau in secret, ai ‘pedagogiei negre’ de care vorbeste aici Dan Alexe. Desigur, zice-se, cu argumente ‘din Scripturi’, caci atunci cind cineva nu are scrupule morale, saau este ignorant cu sistema si intentie, Sctiptura poate fi utilizata penttru a ‘justifica’ orice ineptie.

The Angel of the Stacks

angel

In July 2009 I was in Cambridge for a meeting related to a very important project, called The Way – an adult Orthodox catechism, also known as the ‘Orthodox Alpha’, and visited St. John’s College with Dr. David Frost, a fellow of this College and, at the time, Director of the Institute for Orthodox Christian Studies, at the same university.

Visiting different rooms of the college, where only teachers had access, we started sharing experiences we had during our doctoral studies on providential moments, when the ‘dime dropped’, and we were able to find unexpectedly, on the shelves of academic libraries certain essential materials for the study we did. Continue reading “The Angel of the Stacks”