The Record meets with acclaimed academic Mark Noll – The Wheaton Record – The Wheaton Record

Source: The Record meets with acclaimed academic Mark Noll – The Wheaton Record – The Wheaton Record

A very good interview. Here is a small quote on evangelicalism:
‘If when people hear “evangelical” they think of something political first, then the serious meaning of the word is gone. ‘

And another one, on the Reformation:
‘I myself, I don’t think it’s appropriate either to be completely celebratory about the Reformation or completely negative about the breakup of western Christianity. But there were critical issues having to do with religious authority, location of the nature of divine revelation, the means by which God reconciles people to himself, critical issues having to do with the nature of religion in society, the authority of temporal rulers over spiritual rulers. All of those really important matters were adjusted, shaken up, reformed and revised in about a forty year period. So whether people realize it or not, certainly the Christian churches in the West — and to some extent where the churches have spread in the world — were the heirs of what happened then.

Scot McKnight – Why Be Anglican: The Collects

churchcalendar

Dr. McKnight continues his efforts of explaining why has he joined Anglicanism. As many friends are asking me the same question, I have decided to share here Professor McKnight’s responses. I will not be able to do it better than him, anyway. So, here is a new epidoee in this series. Today, about the Collects.

* * *

The collects of the church reveal the church’s practices and beliefs about prayer; a collect is a set prayer for a set time in the church calendar.

In them we see the church’s theology of prayer come to expression. I posted about the collects here and included a reference to a fine book “collecting” the collects: C. Frederick Barbee and Paul F.M. Zahl,The Collects of Thomas Cranmer.

There are five basic elements of a collect, and each of these expresses the Christian theology of prayer:

1. Address to God
2. Naming a context in which God has been active and therefore why God can be addressed now.
3. The petition.
4. Hoped for outcome.
5. Shaping the prayer in a Trinitarian context.Read More »

Scot McKnight -Why Be Anglican: Prayers of the People

No question about it, but in many churches there is not a designated time for the people to pray. Some churches are just too big for that, and even too big for a pastoral prayer. Others are so focused on the sermon that there is not time left for what we Anglicans call the “prayers of the people.”

In our liturgy, every Sunday, we have a time where we are led by a lay person in prayer. It’s called “intercession” or “intercessory prayers” when we pray for others, and when we do it in public it needs to be the sort of intercession that belongs in public. As a seminary student I had one professor whose opening prayers were of such significance that I wish they had gone into print, which of course they didn’t because they were not scripted prayers, but also because Murray Harris knew his class-opening prayers were so tied to that class, on that day, in that time in history that they weren’t relevant to others in different places and times.

Evidently Sam Wells, formerly chaplain, dean and professor at Duke and now Vicar of St Martin-in-the-Fields church in Trafalgar Square, offered memorable prayers in chapel at Duke, so much so that folks began to gather them up and now we have in Shaping the Prayers of the People: The Art of Intercession, by Samuel Wells and Abigail Kocher, a fine study and collection of intercessory prayers.

Question for you who offer intercessions in public: How much time do you spend preparing? What do you think are the ingredients of good public intercessory prayers? And, pastors, do you offer a Pastoral Prayer in your public worship?

Read the entite text HERE.

 

Scot McKnight -Why Be Anglican: Lectionary

I am doing a series on the blog about why I became Anglican, and thefirst week I looked at the church calendar and last week at worship, and this week I want to dip into “worship,” by which I mean Sunday morning worship service. (I do not equate worship with Sunday morning worship, but Sunday morning worship is worship.) This week I look at the Lectionary.

I’m not a historian of the lectionary, and it is common property to a wide range of churches and that is why today it is called “The Revised Common Lectionary” and it is available online here.

In essence, the RCL is a 3-year cycle of Bible readings for Sunday worship (and daily readings as well). The lectionary is built on the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, with John weaved in over the three years. The Bible readings in a lectionary-based worship service are ordered into an Old Testament lesson, a reading from the Psalms, a reading from an Epistle, and then “The Gospel.”  As the church calendar is rooted in the life of Jesus (see the image above), so the lectionary readings from the Bible aim at the Gospel reading and prepare for it and enhance it. This squares the church on the Gospels as the gospel.

Read HERE the rest of this text

Scot McKnight – Why Be Anglican: Worship

anglican

I am doing a series on the blog about why I became Anglican, and last week I looked at the church calendar, and this week I want to dip into “worship,” by which I mean Sunday morning worship service. (I do not equate worship with Sunday morning worship, but Sunday morning worship is worship.)

If the church calendar shapes the church themes, the church liturgy for Holy Eucharist is shaped by a customary set of elements of the worship service. Each of these is needed, each is integrated into the other, and each is formative for Christian discipleship. To repeat from last week’s blog post, I don’t idealize or idolize Anglican worship, but I believe it is a mature, wise, and deeply theological tradition at work.

I have taken for my text this morning last week’s worship guide, or bulletin. Here are the elements of our worship and eucharist celebration: processional hymn, a call to worship, the Word of God, the proclamation of the Word of God, the Nicene Creed, prayers of the people, confession of sin, passing the peace, and then we move into Eucharist beginning with an offering, doxology, the great thanksgiving, breaking of bread, a prayer of thanksgiving and we close with a blessing.Read More »

Two of My Recent Publications

Note: Recently, I have received two of the publications to which I have contributed lately. Here are a few details about each of them.

* * *

intentional-discipleship-cover

Intentional Discipleship and Disciple-Making. An Anglican Guide for Christian Life and Formation is a publication of The Anglican Consultative Council, aiming to revive interest in the ancient discipline and practice of disciple-making within the Anglican Communion.

My friend, Rev. Mark Oxbrow, asked me to write about the practice of discipleship within the Orthodox Christian tradition. My initial text had to be shortened, in order to fit a very limited space, in which a variety of topics was discussed.

I attach below my short text. Time allowing, I intend to publish on my blog a more extended discussion of this important topic.Read More »

Why Be Anglican?

I begin a series that will seek to shed some light on why I am Anglican. Image used with permission. More than twice a month I am asked “Why did you become Anglican?” The answer to […]

Source: Why Be Anglican?

I get this question too, a lot. So, here is some answer, even if here and there my enphases would be slightly diffeerent than those of Scot McKnight.

Fourth Sunday of Advent 2016 – Light the Candle of Love

AdventWreath

Today we relight the first three candles of the Advent Wreath — the candles of HOPE, PEACE and JOY.

Now we light the fourth candle of Advent. This is the candle of LOVE.

Jesus demonstrated self-giving love in his ministry as the Good Shepherd. Advent is a time for kindness, thinking of others, and sharing with others. It is a time to love as God loved us by giving us his most precious gift. As God is love, let us be love also.

In the Book of Deuteronomy we find these words:

“For the Lord your God is God of gods and Lord of lords, the great God, mighty and awesome, who is not partial and takes no bribe, who executes justice for the orphan and the widow, and who loves the strangers, providing them food and clothing. You shall also love the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt.
— Deuteronomy 10:17-19a
From the Gospel of John we hear:
“I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.”
— John 13:34-35
Let us pray:
Teach us to love, O Lord. May we always remember to put you first as we follow Christ’s footsteps, that we may know your love and show it in our lives. As we prepare for our celebration of Jesus’ birth, also fill our hearts with love for the world, that all may know your love and the one whom you have sent, your son, our Savior. Amen.

(Source, HERE)

Kevin Giles, Grudem, Ware and Eternal Generation – Jesus Creed

Monogenēs once more. Kevin Giles Following the 2016 Evangelical Theological Society annual conference in San Antonia where Dr. Bruce Ware and Dr. Wayne Grudem publicly announced that they had […]

Source: Kevin Giles, Grudem, Ware and Eternal Generation – Jesus Creed

Kevin Giles again about the Trinitarian ‘heresies’ of Wayne Grudem and the rest of his fundamentalist bunch. This time of ‘the doctrine of the eternal generation of the Son’.

Third Sunday of Advent 2016 – Light the Candle of Joy

Third Advent Candle

Today we relight the first two candles of the Advent wreath. The candle of HOPE and the candle of PEACE.

Now we light the third candle of Advent.

This is the candle of JOY. As the coming of Jesus, our Savior, draws nearer, our joy builds with our anticipation of his birth.

From the Book of Isaiah we read the words of our Lord:

“But be glad and rejoice forever in what I am creating; for I am about to create Jerusalem as a joy, and its people as a delight.”
— Isaiah 65:18

From the New Testament, the words of Paul to the people of the church at Galatia:

“The fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. If we live by the Spirit, let us also be guided by the Spirit.”
— Galatians 5:22-25

Let us pray:
We joyfully praise you, O Lord, for the fulfillment of your promise of a Savior and what that means in our lives. Thank you for the gift of salvation through the birth of your son, Jesus. Create us anew as we wait, and help us to see your glory as you fill our lives with your living Spirit. Amen.

(Source, HERE).

Catch up with N.T. Wright’s Lectures from Simply Wright – SMU

Source: Catch up with N.T. Wright’s Lectures from Simply Wright – SMU

Here are the recordings of the lectures given recently by NT Wright at the Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Tx.

22 December – Blessed Clive Staple Lewis Celebrated by Anglicans

CS_Lewis

According to the Anglican lectionary, the Episcopal Church in the US celebrates on 22 December the life of the blessed CS Lewis (see HERE).

Here is an Anglican prayer for this special day:

O God of searing truth and surpassing beauty, we give you thanks for Clive Staples Lewis whose sanctified imagination lights fires of faith in young and old alike; Surprise us also with your joy and draw us into that new and abundant life which is ours in Christ Jesus, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Clive Staples Lewis (“Jack” Lewis to his friends) was a tutor and lecturer at Oxford University, and later Professor of Medieval and Renaissance English Literature at Cambridge University. In the judgment of many, he is the most popular and most effective explainer and defender of the Christian faith writing in English in this century. He tried to make a point of avoiding disputes on matters where Christians disagree, and defending those beliefs which they hold in common. His work was valued by many Christians of widely differing backgrounds: Anglican, Baptist, Methodist, Pentecostal, Presbyterian, Roman Catholic, etc. (Source, HERE)

Pope, Anglican leader, vow joint action on poverty and environment | Religion News Service

ROME (Reuters) The pledge at a vespers prayer service came despite challenges to greater unity posed by differences over women priests and gay marriage.

Source: Pope, Anglican leader, vow joint action on poverty and environment | Religion News Service

Here are two men I deeply love and respect.

Synod of the Church of England – Archbishop Opens Debate on EU Referendum

JustinWelby

Friday 8th July 2016

This is ‘not a time to fear’ but a time to trust God, the Archbishop said in the opening speech of Synod’s debate on the EU referendum today.

The Archbishops of Canterbury and York added the item as urgent business to the Synod agenda, with the members’ consent.

Read the full text of the speech: 

The length of the EU referendum campaign, the high turnout and the clarity of the result means, it seems to me, that whatever our view of what we would have preferred, we must now deal with the world as it is, and seek not merely survival after Brexit – if we were one of the 48 – but the common good, the flourishing of all our citizens and the seizing of the opportunities offered to our nation; above all to witness to the Kingdom of God.Read More »

John Webster, One of the Greatest Contemporary Theologians Went to Glory

john-webster-1955-2016

An academic friend greeted the news of John Webster’s death with a blog post beginning “I’ll have to get out of the habit of referring to Webster as one of the greatest living theologians.” Within academic theology, few would question that assessment; beyond the universities and colleges, few have ever heard of him.

In part, this is down to John’s genuine humility. He was made a canon of Christchurch Cathedral, Oxford, and served on various Church of England committees when asked, but he never went looking for ecclesial honours. Indeed, he never went looking for academic honours either, although they came regularly.

More, however, John’s vocation was academic. He was committed to hard intellectual work, and he made no apology for it. His writing style was uncompromising, and far from accessible even to some specialists. The last time I heard him give a presentation, a few weeks back, one of my PhD students passed me a note asking if I could explain what the title meant! (It was in Latin, and John did not bother to translate it.)

Why should any reader of Christian Today be interested in his life, then?Read More »

Text of the Columba Declaration

Church of England  Church of Scotland

In the light of our common mission and context (chapter 1), our agreement in faith (chapter 2) and our significant opportunities for growing in partnership in mission (chapter 3), we recommend that our churches make the following Declaration.

We, the Church of Scotland and the Church of England, make the following acknowledgements and commitments, which are interrelated.Read More »

The Columba Declaration – Ecumenical Agreement Between the Church of Scotland and the Church of England

Russell Starr , CoS & Justin Welby, CoE
Russell Starr , CoS & Justin Welby, CoE

During the current annual Assembly of the Church of Scotland (Presbyterian), delegates, which included my son, Rev. Daniel Manastireanu, the first ethnically Romanian minister in the CoS, has approved the Columba Declaration, ‘that recognises their longstanding ecumenical partnership and lays the groundwork for future joint projects’ (see HERE). Of the about 850 commissioners to the assembly, 50 voted against this motion and 49 abstained (see HERE). A similar motion was approved by the C of E’s General Synod in February.

St Columba of Iona        St Columba, stained glass at Iona Abbey
Ikon of St Columba, a gift I gave to my son, on his ordination as minister in the CoS, and
St Columba, pictured in a stained glass window at Iona Abbey, which he founded in the sixth century

‘The agreement between the Church of England and the Church of Scotland has been called the Columba Declaration, after Saint Columba [also called Columcille], an Irish abbot and missionary who was credited with spreading Christianity in Scotland. ‘ (see HERE)Read More »

Despre lucrurile cu adevărat importante

Avancronica unui eveniment academic şi cultural major, care se va derula în Iaşi abia peste jumătate de an (…): acordarea domnului Andrei Pleşu, din partea celei mai bătrâne instituţii de învăţământ superior din România, a titlului de doctor honoris causa.

Source: Despre lucrurile cu adevărat importante

Domnul profesor Codrin Cutitaru anunta in Ziarul de Iasi unul dintre cele mai importante evenimente cullturale ale urbei iesene in toamna anului 2016: adordarea titlului de doctor honoris causa domnului Andrei Plesu de catre Universitatea ‘Al. I. Cuza’, eveniment care va prefata a treia editie a simpozionului CS Lewis  organizat de aceeasi universitate, la initiativa doamnei profesoare Denise Vasiliu.

Citez in  incheiere ceva despre asteptarile autorului acestui articol, care sunt, de fapt, si ale noastre: ‘Anticipez un eveniment cu mare impact academic, la care, alături de invitatul principal, vor contribui personalităţile universitare din comisia de laudatio (preşedinte – profesorul Alexandru Călinescu) şi un număr important de universitari de la Oxford şi Cambridge, înscrişi cu lucrări la amintitul simpozion.’

C. S. Lewis and Kindred Spirits, Iasi, 17-18 November 2016

3rd CS Lewis Symposium

Dear friends,

I warmly invite you to the next Lewis symposium we organize at Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi:

The Third Interdisciplinary Symposium devoted to the life and work of C. S Lewis,
C. S. Lewis and Kindred Spirits, Iasi, 17-19 November 2016

This continues the series of events devoted to the celebrated Oxonian writer and scholar and is open to both specialists and lay persons who are interested in, and fascinated by, the Oxford Don’s legacy and influential presence within current culture. We invite papers that explore Lewis’s growth in relation to predecessors and contemporaries, as well as papers who identify “kindred spirits” among subsequent generations of writers and thinkers.

We are also pleased to have Mr. Owen Barfield Jr. as one of the special guests for this edition.

Hoping that you will be willing and able to join,

I look forward to your response.

With best wishes,

Denise Vasiliu

Note: Unfortunately, Mr. Andrei Plesu will not be able to participate in our event, and the Doctor honoris causa ceremony was postponed for some time in the Spring of 2017.

Prayer for the 16th Session of the Anglican Consultative Council, Lusaka, Zambia, 8-19 April 2016

anglican2

prayer

(Source, HERE)

Rachel Held Evans – Donald Trump and a Tale of Two Gospels

Rachel-Held-Evans1
Rachel Held Evans

NOTES: It has been some time since I have shared on my blog a post written by Rachel. But this one is a must, as so many evangelicals in the US seem to be fooled by the perverted version of the gospel promoted by the Republican candidate to the American presidency.

And some good news on Rachel. On Feb 29th, President Obama nominated Rachel Held Evans as member of the President’s Advisory Council on Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. Well done, Rachel.

* * *

As it becomes clear Donald Trump’s candidacy for president will be more than a sideshow this year, the probable Republican nominee is making his pitch to Christian voters.

You would think it would be a hard sell given the fact that the real estate mogul and reality star has boasted about his extramarital affairs, profited off casinos and strip clubs, said he doesn’t need to ask God for forgiveness, called for targeting innocent civilians in war, mocked a reporter with a disability, threatened the religious liberty of minority groups in the U.S., and gained wide support among white nationalists for consistently lying about and demeaning blacks, Mexican immigrants, Muslims, and Syrian refugees.

But polls show that despite all of this, Trump remains favored among evangelical voters. After speaking at Liberty University last week, Trump scored an important endorsement from Jerry Falwell Jr., a prominent leader of the Religious Right who, to the applause of thousands, compared Trump to Jesus and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Read More »

Unity in Diversity

Source: Unity in Diversity

Here is a superb text on church unity, in the wake of the meeting of Anglican primates, written by The Rt Revd Dr Helen-Ann Hartley, Bishop of Waikato in the Diocese of Waikato and Taranaki in the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia.

Epiphany: Light to the Nations

ThreeWiseMen

The Epiphany is, in the Western Christian tradition, the celebtration of the visit of the Mago to the baby Jesus. (In the East, it celebrates the baptism of Jesus).

Here is a short meditation on this important Christian festive day. In the season of Epiphany, the Light that shone at Christmas is revealed to Israel and the nations. A Lectionary reflection on Isaiah 60, Matthew 2 and Ephesians 3.

* * *

Arise, shine, for your light has come, and the glory of the LORD rises upon you. See, darkness covers the earth and thick darkness is over the peoples, but the LORD rises upon you and his glory appears over you.

Nations will come to your light, and kings to the brightness of your dawn. Lift up your eyes and look about you: All assemble and come to you; your sons come from afar, and your daughters are carried on the hip.

Then you will look and be radiant, your heart will throb and swell with joy; the wealth on the seas will be brought to you, to you the riches of the nations will come. Herds of camels will cover your land, young camels of Midian and Ephah. And all from Sheba will come, bearing gold and incense and proclaiming the praise of the LORD. (Isaiah 60:1-6)Read More »

Caring for the Earth – A New Carol

Under the impression of the recent conference in Paris, on climate change, the Rt. Rev. Steven Croft, Anglican Bishop of Sheffield, wrote inspired new words, in Advent mood, for the well known hymn The King of Love My Shepherd Is, which you can listen above.

Here are the words of the new Carol:

Creator of our common home
And maker of such wonder
You crafted fire and sky and stone
Dividing seas asunder.

In love you set the earth in space~
In joy ordained its pathway
Filled earth and sea and sky with grace
That we might praise you always.

We turned away your gift of life
Polluted all you gave us
The land was spoiled, we favoured strife
Lives turned away from goodness.

In Bethlehem you gave your Son
Creator in creation
To win us back and call us home
Revealing your salvation.

The Word of God took human form
Eternity in person
Reason and love came to transform
God’s gift for our conversion.

Creator of our common home
Redeemer of such mercy
Sustainer of all life on earth
To you always be glory.

(Source, HERE)

Bishop Steven Croft
Bishop Steven Croft

 

 

 

Richard Shephard – Let Us Light A Candle in the Darkness

Here are the lyrics, written by Bishop Robert Willis, for this magnificent Advent hymn, composed by Richard Shephard.Read More »

Seven reasons to ban the Lord’s Prayer

Note: This is a brilliant response to the ban of the Lord’s Prayer video in UK cinemas. As I have already written on a previous comment on this incident, prayer is, indeed,  powerful. And UK cinema owners recognise that, in their own crooked way.

 

Britain woke up this morning to the news that the Lord’s Prayer has been banned from cinemas. The Church of England has produced a sixty second commercial.  The only words are the words of the Lord’s Prayer, said by children, the bereaved, people at work and so on.  It’s a beautiful film, Certificate U. The ad is to promote a new website, Just Pray.uk.  The plan was (and is) to show the film before Christmas at screenings of the new Star Wars film to help everyone think about prayer and to pray.  What could be more simple? The distributors have declared the Lord’s Prayer unsuitable for screening.  They believe it carries the risk of upsetting or offending audiences.  Cue indignation from the press, fury from the Archbishop (according to the Mail anyway) debates about free speech, a possible challenge in the courts and a storm on social media. But wait just a moment.  Suppose the cinema chains got this one right? I disagree with their decision and I disagree with the reasons they have given.  I hope it’s reversed.  I don’t believe the film will offend or upset audiences, in the way they mean, and I don’t believe it creates a new precedent.  But from the point of view of global corporations and consumer culture, from the perspective of the gods and spirits of the age, there are very good reasons indeed to ban the Lord’s Prayer from cinemas and from culture and from public life.  This is a prayer said by billions of people every day in every language on the planet.  In every single moment in time, someone is praying these words.  They are the first words of prayer we learn as children and the last words we say at the moment of death.  The Lord’s Prayer is powerful for a reason.  These words shape lives and families and communities and whole societies.  There are real reasons why the Lord’s Prayer has been banned by the demigods of consumer culture, in the boardrooms of the cinema chains.  Here are seven, one for every line. First, this prayer gives to those who pray it an identity and a place in the world and a countercultural community.  “Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name”.  It opposes the myth that we are random specks of matter floating through space and time.  It opposes the myth that our lives do not matter.  It opposes the myth of fragmented humanity.  We are created and loved and called into friendship with God who is our father and into community with our fellow human beings who are therefore our sisters and brothers.  Only someone who has found this new identity can stand against the advertising culture which night and day seduces us to define who we are by what we spend. Second this prayer gives us the courage to live in an imperfect world.  “Your kingdom come.  Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven”.  The world is not as it was meant to be.  It is distorted from its true purpose.  But God is at work to redeem and transform this world, to establish his kingdom.  The Lord’s Prayer invites us not to retreat from the world in fear and pain, to anaesthetise or indulge ourselves.  The Lord’s Prayer invites us to join the struggle to see justice and peace prevail.  Third, and most powerfully, the Lord’s Prayer teaches us to live with just enough.  This is the most dangerous reason why it cannot be shown with the adverts at the cinema.  It teaches us not to want more.  It teaches contentment, the most subversive virtue of them all. “Give us this day our daily bread”.  This is not a prayer for more.  This is a prayer only for what we need.  Every other advert in the cinema is there to encourage us to spend money in pursuit of happiness.  This one restrains our greed.  Fourth, the Lord’s Prayer teaches me to live with my imperfections and the imperfections of others.  There is a way to deal with the rubbish in our lives.  “Forgive us our sins”. Consumer culture holds before us the image of perfection.  We cannot be happy until we look like this person, live like that one.  Each image is a lie. The Lord’s Prayer acknowledges human imperfection and sin, daily.  The Lord’s Prayer offers a pathway to forgiveness, daily. The way of forgiveness cannot be bought.  It is a gift.  Grace.  Grace subverts the whole culture of advertising. Fifth the Lord’s Prayer offers a way of reconciliation.  “Forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us”.  We are not meant to feud or live in hostility or rivalry.  We are meant to forgive and be forgiven, to be reconciled to each other.  That reconciliation happens without expensive prese

Source: Seven reasons to ban the Lord’s Prayer

Communiqué of the International Commission for Anglican-Orthodox Theological Dialogue

International Commission for Anglican-Orthodox Theological Dialogue

September 2015, Buffalo, New York, United States of America

In the name of the Triune God, and with the blessing and guidance of our Churches, the International Commission for Anglican-Orthodox Theological Dialogue (ICAOTD) met in Buffalo, New York, from 19 to 25 September 2015. The Commission is deeply grateful for the generous hospitality extended by the Orthodox Church of the Annunciation in Buffalo (Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople).

Metropolitan Nicholas of Detroit formally welcomed the Commission to its meeting in his diocese. He offered praise and encouragement for the work of the dialogue. He stressed the urgent need for expressions of Christian unity in light of the deep challenges and crises before the global community, mindful of events unfolding even as the Commission undertook its deliberations.

The Commission brought to completion the first section of its work on the theological understanding of the human person, with the adoption of its agreed statement, In the Image and Likeness of God: A Hope-Filled Anthropology. The report, shortly to be published, is the culmination of six years of study on what Anglicans and Orthodox can say together about the meaning of human personhood in the divine image.Read More »

Q&A with Justin Welby, ARchbishop of Canterbury, in Birmingham

THis is a very refreshingly natural dialogue.

 

Peste 1.500.000 de vizite

Astazi blogul Persona a trecut pragul 1.500.000 de vizite. Nu e mult, comparat cu blogurile profesionistilor. Dar ce folos are comparatia, cind suntem cu totii unici, si avem fiecare audienta pe care o meritam.

Iata citeva date statistice:

– 7290 postari

– 72 de categorii (si incerc sa ramin la acestea)

– 6.378 de etichete

– 421 followers

Si ma opresc aici, pentruca la ora 2.am plec din hotelul din Nicosia spre Romania.

Archbishop of Canterbury’s Ascension Day Sermon

Ascension

Thursday 14th May 2015

Sermon preached by Archbishop Justin Welby at the Ascension Day Eucharist at St Martin-in-the-Fields, Trafalgar Square, London.

* * *

Acts 1:1-11, Luke 24:44-53

Ascension is about power and victory, but not as we know it.

If you’re a fan of Star Trek you’ll hear the allusion: “It’s life, Jim, but not as we know it.” Though I’m told no one ever actually said that, any more than Sherlock Holmes said, “Elementary, my dear Watson”. But even though I am not a Trekkie it’s a good line.

Ascension is about power or victory, but not as we know it. The accounts include words like ‘power’, ‘Kingdom’, ‘witness’, ‘proofs’, and ‘promise of the Father’ – such that the disciples, who weren’t any quicker on the uptake after the resurrection than before, ask about the restoration of the Kingdom of Israel.Read More »