Hind Makki – 7 Questions to Ask Before Asking if Muslims Condemn Terrorism

Many in the Western world, especially among Christians, are asking why Muslims are not condemning terrorism. As if this would be a self-evident fact.

They at least ask. There is, however, even among Christians, especially those of a more fundamentalist persuasion, a growing number of people who are simply accusing Muslims that, in fact, they are not only NOT condemning violence in the name of Allah, but in fact they are condoning it. And, tho this, they add that violence and terrorism is intrinsic to the Muslim faith and the Qur’an.

Such people are guilty of conveniently forgetting the violence done in the past, or present, by Christians, in the name of their own faith,  from the Crusades, to the present so-called ‘war on terror’, as well as the violence and terrorism used by Jews, in the name of Yahweh, either in the so-called Joshua genocide, or the use of sheer terrorism in Palestine prior to the establishment of the state of Israel, in 1948. Not to speak of Israel’s state terrorism during the present bloody war in Gaza.

This being the case, it is good for us to listen to the voice of moderate Muslims, as we may learn a thing or two from them. During my work for World Vision, I had myself the privilege of meeting a few such moderate voices, among which I have to mentioned Dr. Muhammad Farooq Khan, from Pakistan, who paid with his life for his convictions and his actions on behalf of peace and inter-faith reconciliation.

I copy here below a set of questions that Hind Makki, a Muslim journalist in Chicago, suggests we should ask before wondering if Muslims condemn or not violence in the name of Islam (an example of which you can see in the video clip above). Here are the questions:

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Questions to ask myself before I publicly wonder whether Muslims condemn terrorism:

1) Do I know any Muslims in real life that I can ask?

2) Am I actually following any Muslim activists, scholars or leaders on social media outlets?

3) Am I assuming that if Muslims are not condemning violence done by other Muslims 24/7 in the medium that I personally follow, so that I can see it when I check into FB or Twitter at a time convenient for me, then that means Muslims support terrorism and are inherently violent people because of their religion?

4) When I meet a person of a different faith is my immediate assumption, “This person is Catholic, he must be a child molester” or “This Jewish woman hates all Muslim children and wants them to be bombed” or “This person is a Christian, he must want to steal the money of gullible old white ladies who think the Rapture is imminent?” Or is my assumption when I meet people is that they believe all these things are abhorrent and that we share these basic values?

5) If some people of a faith tradition have committed criminal acts, even if they claim it’s done in God’s name, does it automatically mean that every person of that faith tradition supports crime?

6) This Hindtrospectives blogger sure sounds mad. She claims that Muslims have been condemning all kinds of Muslim terrorism for over at least over a decade on every medium available to them. Is it up to me to find these condemnations, or is it up to them to make sure I see the thousands of condemnations they’ve issued in the past?

7) Do I know what a search engine is? If so, I wonder what will come up when I type “Muslims condemning terrorism?”

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You may read HERE the entire article. I thank my friend Dr. Martin Accad for this link.

Hind Makki
Hind Makki

The daughter of African immigrants to the American Midwest, Hind has long been interested in understanding the impact of migration, race, religion on shaping the development of Western Muslim consciousness. She has worked extensively within the American Muslim community on civic engagement, interfaith dialogue and leadership development and has traveled throughout the United States and Western Europe, leading workshops on social cohesion through interfaith action and dialogue.
Hind grew up in a somewhat insular, mainly Arab American, Muslim community in suburban Chicago,  where the mosque was an integral part of her childhood. When over 300 people marched on that mosque on the evening of the September 11 attacks, Hind was motivated to work toward interfaith cooperation in her community. In her writings, Hind often explores how religious pluralism in secular democracies intersects with race, class and access to social and political capital for minority communities. She is a fan of popular culture, female characters in dystopian novels, international sport and good, non-pretentious literature.

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You may also read HERE and article on why we tend to not hear when Muslims condemn terrorism.

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Author: DanutM

Anglican theologian. Former Director for Faith and Development Middle East and Eastern Europe Region of World Vision International

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