From Bondage to the Desert – Introduction – 1

Argument for the Present Study

The destructive nature of communism is today a proven fact of history. The Black Book of Communism records over 100 million victims of Marxism as a state ideology since 1917, the year of the Russian Revolution, from the millions killed by Stalin, through the numerous victims of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, to the over two million Cambodians killed by the Khmer Rouge. Yet unequivocal statements about the evil nature of communism are rare in political and academic circles today. Former communist countries have never gone through a process of de-communisation comparable to the denazification programme carried out in Germany.

We may fairly ask what reason there is for this striking anomaly. In the first place it is evidence of the surprisingly lasting results of the effective propaganda campaign launched and sustained in the West by the communist regimes and their sympathisers.

A second reason, as important as the first, may be that many academic circles in the West, especially in the humanities, continue to be dominated by left-leaning people who are still impressed with what they naively suppose to be the noble ideals of Marxism.

The third reason is that former communist and secret police leaders still control, directly or indirectly, the economic and political life of many of the post-communist countries.

This phenomenon of the persistence of such irrational attitudes calls for a much firmer confrontation and much more thorough research and documentation to convince today’s world that Marxism was not an idealistic utopia, but rather a dehumanising totalitarian ideology. This is probably the only way to avoid the tragedy of such regimes gaining power in the future.

People who have lived in communist countries have all been thoroughly brainwashed by this ideology, some to a greater degree than others. No one was spared. The result is that we have become distorted human beings. Since the fall of communism, we have been unwilling to go back to the old ways, yet we are utterly incapable of functioning normally in the new world that is being built before our eyes. Very few of us are aware of and willing to reckon with this situation. This is why we feel under an obligation to pursue this line of research, so that we can help our readers to be able, as the well-known prayer says, ‘to have the serenity to accept the things that we cannot change, the courage to change the things that we can, and the wisdom to know the difference’.

Author: DanutM

Anglican theologian. Former Director for Faith and Development Middle East and Eastern Europe Region of World Vision International

One thought on “From Bondage to the Desert – Introduction – 1”

  1. de cele mai multe ori in istorie marile schimbari au avut loc violent. comunismul nu face exceptie. lenin spunea ca ‘revolutia franceza nu a reusit pentru ca nu si-a lichidat toti dusmanii. de aceea noi nu vom mai repeta aceiasi greseala.’ dar au facut altele.

    noi ne lamentam in romania ca am facut schimbarea dar nu s-a schimbat mare lucru. l-am injurat pe prorocul comunist care ne-a spus gresit ca vom avea nevoie de 15 ani sa se schimbe ceva. suntem la 20 si tot nu se vede mare lucru. evreii au avut nevoie de 40 de ani in desert, in marsuri si in prezenta lui dumnezeu. cum sunt pesimist, cred ca nu o sa ajungem in ‘tara promisa’ in urmatorii 40 de ani. dar. n-are conteaza, ca eu nu voi mai fi aici.

    venind vorba de credinte irationale, cred ca ele sunt alimentate din plin si de noi.

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